A Day In The Life

Women in the workforce with small children at home have extraordinary demands on their time (no matter how helpful their husbands). This fact becomes especially public when the woman in question is a United States Senator. All Senators travel between their states and their jobs in Washington. Further, Senators, unlike Representatives, in theory and in practice represent both their states and national interests. And when in session, the Senate works long hours and places great stress on its members. For a young mother of young children, all of this adds up to a remarkable schedule. I recently had the opportunity to watch such a schedule in operation.

Kirsten Gillibrand, the junior Senator from New York, has been in the news a lot lately. During the lame duck session she was instrumental in the passage of the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell repeal and the 9/11 Responders legislation. More recently and more tragically, she is a good friend of Gabby Giffords and has spent significant time at her friend’s side in Tucson. Less visibly, she has all the duties of the Senate and the concomitant need to be constantly raising money. It was in pursuit of this latter objective that I spent some time with Senator Gillibrand in Los Angeles.

She had flown from Washington to San Francisco the day before for events in Northern California. She flew from San Francisco to Los Angeles for our meeting and at least three subsequent sessions. The Senator then got up early the next morning to fly back to Washington to be at her desk during the day and with her family (visiting from New York) at night. This sort of schedule is not partisan. Republicans and Democrats alike in the Senate work this hard. Yes, the prestige and power (although not the pay) that come with a seat in the Senate are exceptional. Nonetheless, the hard work required is enormous and something we should be appreciative of.

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 Women in the workforce with small children at home have extraordinary demands on their time (no matter how helpful their husbands). This fact becomes especially public when the woman in question is a United States Senator. All Senators travel between their states and their jobs in Washington. Further, Senators, unlike Representatives, in theory and in practice represent both their states and national interests. And when in session, the Senate works long hours and places great stress on its members. For a young mother of young children, all of this adds up to a remarkable schedule. I recently had the opportunity to watch such a schedule in operation.
Kirsten Gillibrand, the junior Senator from New York, has been in the news a lot lately. During the lame duck session she was instrumental in the passage of the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell repeal and the 9/11 Responders legislation. More recently and more tragically, she is a good friend of Gabby Giffords and has spent significant time at her friend’s side in Tucson. Less visibly, she has all the duties of the Senate and the concomitant need to be constantly raising money. It was in pursuit of this latter objective that I spent some time with Senator Gillibrand in Los Angeles.
She had flown from Washington to San Francisco the day before for events in Northern California. She flew from San Francisco to Los Angeles for our meeting and at least three subsequent sessions. The Senator then got up early the next morning to fly back to Washington to be at her desk during the day and with her family (visiting from New York) at night. This sort of schedule is not partisan. Republicans and Democrats alike in the Senate work this hard. Yes, the prestige and power (although not the pay) that come with a seat in the Senate are exceptional. Nonetheless, the hard work required is enormous and something we should be appreciative of.
 

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Posted in Articles, Kirsten Gillibrand, Mark Alderman, Washington, D.C.

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